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Weitere Publikationen der WIFO-Mitarbeiterinnen und -Mitarbeiter

Die umfangreiche Publikationstätigkeit der Mitarbeiterinnen und Mitarbeiter des WIFO dokumentiert die enge Vernetzung mit der internationalen Scientific Community.

Weitere Publikationen: Peter Huber(49 Treffer)

Peter Huber, Harald Oberhofer, Michael Pfaffermayr, Who creates jobs? Econometric modeling and evidence for Austrian firm level data

European Economic Review, 2016, 91, S.57-71
This paper provides evidence on the role of firm size and firm age for firm level net job creation in the Austrian economy between 1993 and 2013 and during the Great Recession. We propose a new estimation strategy based on a two-part model to decompose behavioural differences between exiting and surviving firms. Young firms contribute most to net job creation, despite high relative exit rates, due to high growth rates among young surviving firms. Small firms have similar job creation rates conditional on survival as large firms. Small firms' contribution to job creation is, however, smaller due to higher exit rates. The up-or-out dynamics characterising less regulated economies such as the USA also apply to the more regulated Austrian economy. During the Great Recession both the relative net job creation rate conditional on survival and the relative survival probability of young firms decreased. The relative contribution of small firms to net job creation, by contrast, increased due to increased relative job creation rates of small firms conditional on survival.
 

Peter Huber, Doris A. Oberdabernig, The impact of welfare benefits on natives' and immigrants' attitudes toward immigration

European Journal of Political Economy, 2016, 44, S.53-78
We investigate the effect of the relative welfare dependence of immigrants on attitudes toward further immigration of different groups of the population in a pooled cross-section of 24 European countries for the 2004-2010 period. Explicitly controlling for the dependence of immigrants and natives on welfare benefits we find that in countries with higher take-up rates among immigrants relative to natives pro-immigration attitudes, very robustly, increase more strongly with increasing educational attainment and, slightly less robustly, decline more strongly with the age of natives. Within the group of immigrants, by contrast, the impact of age on pro-immigration attitudes is more favourable with increasing relative benefit take-up of immigrants.
 

Peter Huber, Jürgen Bierbaumer-Polly, Petr Rozmahel, Regional Business-Cycle Synchronization, Sector Specialization and EU Accession

Journal of Common Market Studies, 2016, 54(3), S.544-568
We examine the effects of Eastern and Northern enlargement of the EU on regional business-cycle synchronisation and sector specialisation. Difference-in-difference estimates show that cyclical synchronicity decreased and differences in sector structure increased in acceding region-pairs after Eastern enlargement. For Northern enlargement, results are more ambiguous. Moreover, in both enlargement episodes, region-pairs with highly synchronous business cycles before accession experienced weaker cyclical and structural convergence than region-pairs with less synchronous cycles. Likewise, region-pairs with more similar sector structures before accession experienced stronger divergence (or weaker convergence) of structural similarity and business-cycle synchronicity after the enlargement. We argue that these results call for developing more differentiated hypotheses on EU enlargement's effects on business-cycle synchronisation and sector specialisation.
 

Peter Huber, Klaus Nowotny, The Impact Of Relative Deprivation On Return Intentions Among Potential Migrants And Commuters

Journal of Regional Science, 2016, 56(3), S.471-493
We empirically analyse the impact of relative deprivation on the intended duration of stay of potential cross-border commuters and migrants. A theoretical model lends support to the hypothesis that deprivation affects the intended duration of stay of migrants in a U-shaped fashion, but does not affect potential commuters. Empirical evidence from one of the most densely populated border regions of the EU confirms both these hypotheses. These results are robust over different estimation methods and apply both when measuring deprivation relative to friends and acquaintances as well as relative to the population residing in a region.
 

Peter Huber, Doris A. Oberdabernig, Decomposing Welfare Wedges: An Analysis of Welfare Dependence of Immigrants and Natives in Europe

Kyklos, 2016, 69(1), S.82-107
We study differences in contributory and non-contributory welfare benefit receipt between immigrants and natives for 16 EU countries. In contrast to previous studies we analyse differences in benefit levels allowing for potentially different takeup rates between immigrants and natives and use Oaxaca-Blinder decompositions to discuss residual welfare dependence. Results point to substantial heterogeneity in welfare dependence between countries when not controlling for observed characteristics of immigrants and natives. This is primarily due to different selection into benefits between immigrants and natives and differences in their characteristics (mainly income, personal, and household characteristics). Once this is controlled for, immigrants participate at most equally often in both types of benefits as natives and usually also receive lower or comparable benefit levels.
 

Peter Huber, Francisca Bremberger, Rudolf Hochholzer, Labour Turnover, Employment Density and Employer Provided Training: Evidence from Vienna

European Journal of Business Science and Technology, 2016, 2(1), S.5-22
We analyse the impact of regional and sectoral labour market characteristics as determinants of the supply of employer financed training using a unique data set on employer provided training in Vienna. According to the results labour turnover has a robust negative impact and employment density a slightly less robust but also negative impact on the probability of a firm to provide employer financed training. Policies directed at increasing employer provided training may therefore face substantial challenges in sectors and regions with high labour turnover and employment densities. These challenges are likely to be even larger when it comes to providing employer financed training for less skilled workers.
 

Peter Huber, Francisca Bremberger, Rudolf Hochholzer, Labour turnover, employment density and employer provided training: Evidence from Vienna

MENDELU Working Papers in Business and Economics, 2016, 25 Seiten
We analyse the impact of regional and sectoral labour market characteristics as determinants of the supply of employer financed training using a unique data set on employer provided training in Vienna. According to the results labour turnover has a robust negative impact and employment density a slightly less robust but also negative impact on the probability of a firm to provide employer financed training. Policies directed at increasing employer provided training may therefore face substantial challenges in sectors and regions with high labour turnover and employment densities. These challenges are likely to be even larger when it comes to providing employer financed training for less skilled workers.
 

Peter Huber, The governance of regional labour market policies, in: Thomas Sauer, Susanne Elsen, Christina Grazillo, Cities in Transition: Social Innovation for Europe's Urban Sustainability

Buchbeiträge, Routledge, 2016, S.158-191
 

Peter Huber, Neue soziale Risiken am Wiener Arbeitsmarkt, in: Josef Schmee (Hrsg.), Wiener Herausforderungen – Arbeitsmarkt, Bildung, Wohnung und Einkommen

 
Online seit: 29.04.2015 15:38

Peter Huber, Danuše Nerudová, Petr Rozmahel, Competitiveness, Social Inclusion and Sustainability in a Diverse European Union – Perspectives from Old and New Member States

Bücher und Monographien, Springer, Heidelberg, 2015
 
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